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Time for change

An online survey shows we are carrying on as usual

It’s safe to say that the summer of 2016 will go down in history. With our (somewhat) surprise referendum outcome, the resulting political turmoil, a (possibly) changing economy and a brand new Prime Minister appointed earlier than expected, it’s been a busy few weeks for the UK.

But what does it mean for us citizens? Amid the general uncertainty of both our exit from the EU and the political tower of cards playing out at Westminster, a recent survey has revealed that it’s pretty much ‘business as usual’ for most of us at the moment.

The online poll showed that the majority of people taking part in the survey do not believe that their finances will be hit by the result of Brexit in the upcoming months. Over three quarters of people in the survey thought that their personal finances will be either unchanged or better in the next six months, with only a quarter of people saying they thought their financial situation would deteriorate.

In spite of the stark warnings of a doomed economy - with mass job losses and redundancies, and a huge downturn in investment if Brexit was to go ahead - it seems most of us are, largely, trying to keep calm and carry on as normal. That’s a pretty impressive stance from the general public.

It’s undeniable that this is a real time for change in the UK. Some of us may be struggling with our identity, feeling estranged from our EU neighbours and being forced to go it alone. It’s a bit like being ousted by your distant relatives, who you didn’t necessarily like all that much but it was pretty much all you knew.

Well, that’s the thing about change: it can be painful in the short term but can sometimes work out for the better. I sincerely hope this ‘summer of change’ for the UK will prove to be positive eventually.

Let’s look at a few positives of our changing times:

  1. We don’t have Donald Trump as our potential leader. Like Theresa May or not, she may help a generation of young people to realise they can run the country even when they don’t fit the traditional ‘Eton, male and pale’ mould.
  2. We may have voted ‘Brexit’, but the country hasn’t quite fallen apart (as we were warned by some members for Remain).
  3. The Labour Party may be divided, some people may be calling for a general election and we have Boris as Foreign Secretary, BUT at least we still have a democracy. Mostly.
  4. It’s officially August and we have had at least three days of summer so far. Now, there’s something to shout about.

Socrates said: “The secret of change is to focus all your energy not on fighting the old but on building the new”. It’s true that the Brexit vote won, the pound fell to a 31 year low and the future of the EU itself was questioned. But that is now the old. Since we have managed to get this far, let’s hope we can focus on a positive future and make the best out of what will come our way before next summer. Whatever change may bring to the UK, I’m sure we will remain resilient.

What do you think? Are you afraid of the post-Brexit uncertainty, or are you considering it an opportunity to improve? Join the discussion on Facebook and let us know! Plus, don’t forget to have your say and earn money in your spare time in our latest paid surveys at Opinion Outpost UK.

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